The New Mobile Identity: more security, more privacy

The New Mobile Identity: more security, more privacy

Safer, more secure and with more convenience. The mobile identity has been lacking efficiency, was too complicated for developers and missed engagement opportunities. Until now.

AVG’s CEO Gary Kovacs criticises the way mobile apps are being build. He finds coding has become a language unreachable and often incomprehensible to many developers. And there are just too many platforms. “Codes should be more simple”, he says at Mobile World Congress in the New Mobile Identity Session. “Next to that, there’s Android, Windows and iOS. Every household must have 50 products to use all these platforms. It just doesn’t scale.”

Kovacs says the new mobile identity will be about protecting privacy, especially if it comes to children. He sees his 10 years old daughter getting online and struggling with pages and pages of privacy policies. “She once found a privacy policy which she sent to me. I analysed it in context and saw that for her to read it, that would take about 76 days. How and why did we come to that point?”

Why do you sell my data?

The CEO of AVG Technology promotes his one-page challenge in which he urges software-selling companies to get policies down to a single page. He furthermore pushes them to answer questions like ‘Why do you sell my data?’ and ‘Why do you collect my data?’ “The things they collect from my daughter is utterly exorbitant: phone number, profile pictures, email address.”

Online identities

CEO Pat Geisinger from VMware sees a rather concerning development in securing online identities, transactions and other activities. “We are spending more on security but as a whole we are being less effective if it comes to improving the security of our mobile identity. Something is fundamentally broken here.” Geisinger thinks innovations are done too much in silos. “It must come out, companies have to work together in securing our mobile identity.”

Mobile voting for Parliamentary elections

Estonia must own securing mobile identity as they launched a system that lets Estonians vote through online mobile apps for crucial activities as Parliamentary elections. In the Netherlands voting is done with a pencil, Estonians however check in with their mobile phones or through web applications and within 30 seconds their vote has been sent, secured with certificates, two-factor authentication, an ID card and Mobile ID. “We struggle being Estonians with winters that last for nine months”, says developer of the eVoting-system, Taavi Kotka, “but we vote mobile.”

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Erik Eggens is an allround journalist, editor, content creator and copywriter and takes a keen interest in mobile, finance and politics.

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